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The Declaration of Independence in Wingdings

I recently saw the entire HBO mini-series, John Adams, in one sitting. Needless to say, I experienced a heightened sense of patriotism and had an urge to create something to capture my feeling of euphoria.

I choose to recreate the Declaration of Independence using the wingdings font as an attempt to combine my love for history and the digital world. The symbols can be translated back to the regular alphabet showing the entire statement as seen on the real Declaration of Independence (line breaks, character spacing and the names of the signers).

Download the PDF version to see the original and translatable file.  Warning: 10mb file

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  1. April 16th, 2009 at 23:17 | #1

    nice, really nice!

  2. Wowgirl
    May 13th, 2009 at 09:27 | #2

    This is awesome.

  3. July 11th, 2014 at 01:13 | #3

    Well first of all the A.O.C. were the Original idea for how the united setats of america would be governed. But once they found out that they were a weak form of government congress (and every one els) decided to throw them out, so they went to work on a new form of government. Eventually America was split up into two different people Federalist and Anti-Federalist. The federalist wanted a strong central government and the Anti wanted a weak central government. Eventually they agreed to come up with the Constitution, and afterwords the Bill of rights. The main difference is that the A.O.C. were a weak and unsuccessful goverment.But the summary of the A.O.C. is ..Establishes the name of the confederation as The United States of America. Asserts the equality of the separate setats with the confederation government, i.e. Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom, and independence, and every power, jurisdiction, and right, which is not by this Confederation expressly delegated. Establishes the United States as a new nation, a sovereign union of sovereign setats, united . . . for their common defense, the security of their liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other, against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them . . . , while declaring that the union is perpetual, and can only be altered by approval of Congress with ratification by all the state legislatures. Establishes freedom of movement–anyone can pass freely between setats, excluding paupers, vagabonds, and fugitives from justice. All people are entitled to the rights established by the state into which he travels. If a crime is committed in one state and the perpetrator flees to another state, he will be extradited to and tried in the state in which the crime was committed. Allocates one vote in the Congress of the Confederation (United States in Congress Assembled) to each state, which was entitled to a delegation of between two and seven members. Members of Congress were appointed by state legislatures; individuals could not serve more than three out of any six years. Only the central government is allowed to conduct foreign relations and to declare war. No setats may have navies or standing armies, or engage in war, without permission of Congress (although the state militias are encouraged). When an army is raised for common defense, colonels and military ranks below colonel will be named by the state legislatures. Expenditures by the United States will be paid by funds raised by state legislatures, and apportioned to the setats based on the real property values of each.Defines the powers of the central government: to declare war, to set weights and measures (including coins), and for Congress to serve as a final court for disputes between setats. Defines a Committee of the States to be a government when Congress is not in session. Requires nine setats to approve the admission of a new state into the confederacy; pre-approves Canada, if it applies for membership. Reaffirms that the Confederation accepts war debt incurred by Congress before the Articles.

  4. July 12th, 2014 at 10:30 | #4

    You’re a real deep thinker. Thanks for sharing.

  5. July 12th, 2014 at 11:54 | #5

    I was so confused about what to buy, but this makes it understandable.

  6. July 12th, 2014 at 12:20 | #6

    Ah, i see. Well that’s not too tricky at all!”

  7. July 12th, 2014 at 12:32 | #7

    More posts of this quality. Not the usual c***, please

  8. July 12th, 2014 at 12:36 | #8

    Articles like this are an example of quick, helpful answers.

  9. July 12th, 2014 at 12:44 | #9

    Frankly I think that’s absolutely good stuff.

  10. July 12th, 2014 at 12:53 | #10

    I think you’ve just captured the answer perfectly

  11. July 23rd, 2014 at 10:10 | #11

    I had no idea how to approach this before-now I’m locked and loaded.

  12. August 8th, 2014 at 19:08 | #12

    We’ve arrived at the end of the line and I have what I need!

  13. August 13th, 2014 at 18:58 | #13

    A wonderful job. Super helpful information.

  14. August 15th, 2014 at 20:52 | #14

    What’s it take to become a sublime expounder of prose like yourself?

  15. August 15th, 2014 at 21:54 | #15

    At last! Something clear I can understand. Thanks!

  16. October 14th, 2014 at 22:17 | #16

    Wow! Great thinking! JK

  1. March 5th, 2014 at 08:43 | #1